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Biden should take advantage of his strenghts to build support for his agenda

President Biden will be sworn in as President in a divided and polarized country that is being ravaged by a terrible virus and mired in recessionary economic conditions. Most likely he will have an intransigent Republican-controlled Senate that will greatly limit his room for maneuver and make it impossible for him to undertake some of the biggest legislative changes he was proposing for his first year in office. Nevertheless, many of these challenges provide Biden with an opportunity that his predecessors did not have—which is that he can more easily preside over rapid improvements and thus use his first two years to make some progress while building a stronger case for his ideas, and if necessary to implement them, his party in the future. An overview of the elections results by Jason Furman for Terra Nova, Professor at Harvard University and Former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, 2013-2017 during Barack Obama's second mandate.

Synthèse

President Biden will be sworn in as President in a divided and polarized country that is being ravaged by a terrible virus and mired in recessionary economic conditions. Most likely he will have an intransigent Republican-controlled Senate that will greatly limit his room for maneuver and make it impossible for him to undertake some of the biggest legislative changes he was proposing for his first year in office. Nevertheless, many of these challenges provide Biden with an opportunity that his predecessors did not have—which is that he can more easily preside over rapid improvements and thus use his first two years to make some progress while building a stronger case for his ideas, and if necessary to implement them, his party in the future. An overview of the elections results by Jason Furman for Terra Nova, Professor at Harvard University and Former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, 2013-2017 during Barack Obama's second mandate. 

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